NWAC Congratulates AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde

PRESS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

(December 12, 2014) (Ottawa, ON) – The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) would like to congratulate Perry Bellegarde, who was elected National Chief at the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) Special Chiefs Assembly at the recent gathering in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

NWAC is looking forward to working with National Chief Perry Bellegarde to help push for an inquiry into the missing and murdered Aboriginal women, a national action plan to address violence and also to work on other key issues such as economic prosperity and stability, education, health and social reform. “NWAC congratulates National Chief Bellegarde on his victory and looks forward to continuing to work with the AFN on matters of mutual interest and concern. We wish him great success in all his endeavors as National Chief,” said President Michèle Taïna Audette.
The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political wellbeing of First Nations and Métis women within First Nation, Métis and Canadian societies. As a national organization representing Aboriginal women since 1974, NWAC’s mandate is to achieve equality for all Aboriginal women in Canada.

For additional information please contact:

Claudette Dumont-Smith, Executive Director
Toll free 1-800-461-4043
Tel.: 613-722-3033 x. 223
cdumontsmith@nwac.ca

14.12.12 NWAC Congratulates Perry Bellegarde AFN National Chief

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Recipient Of The Vox Libra Award

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(December 8, 2014) (Ottawa, ON) – The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) was the recipient of the Vox Libera Award at the 2014 Canadian Journalists for Free Expression (CJFE) Gala on December 3 in Toronto.

NWAC received this award for their ongoing work and tireless effort, over the past several years, to bring national and international attention to the high numbers of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls and of the unacceptable high rates of violence experienced by many. Through their groundbreaking research carried out through the Sisters in Spirit Initiative, during 2005-2010, NWAC created a comprehensive database that listed 582 Aboriginal women and girls who went missing or were murdered between 1960 and 2010.

“Through its tireless work NWAC has brought the issue of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada to the fore,” said Carol Off, Chair of the CJFE Gala. “Their work to bring this systemic problem to light is exactly what the Vox Libera represents. We are very honoured to be presenting NWAC with this award.”

NWAC Vice-President Dr. Dawn Harvard accepted the award on the organization’s behalf. In her acceptance speech Dawn said, in reference to the many missing Aboriginal women and girls, “They’re not missing. They’re not like so many misplaced keys, or your wallet, or your sunglasses. These women and girls were stolen.”

NWAC continues to call for a national public inquiry and a comprehensive action plan to address the crisis of missing and murdered Aboriginal women in Canada. NWAC will continue to work at raising the awareness of issues affecting Aboriginal women and for widespread policy changes so they can achieve equality to that of other women in Canadian society.

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well-being of First Nations and Métis women within Canada. As a national organization representing Aboriginal women since 1974, NWAC’s mandate is to achieve equality for all Aboriginal women in Canada.

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For additional information, please contact:

Claudette Dumont Smith, Executive Director
1-800-461-4043 or cdumontsmith@nwac.ca

14.12.08 Recipient of the Vox Libera Award

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25 Years Later – Violence is Still Rampant in Canada

PRESS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

(December 5, 2014) (Ottawa, ON) – The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) recognizes the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women and solemnly acknowledges the 25th anniversary of the murders of 14 young women at l’École Polytechnique de Montréal and the ongoing violence against Aboriginal women and girls. “We mourn the high rates of violence against Aboriginal women, and we are very concerned for the safety and security of all women,” said Michèle Audette, President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada.

“We need to work together – Aboriginal Peoples and all Governments to put in place measures that protect our women and young girls. The provinces and territories and Aboriginal Peoples have all supported the call for a national public inquiry and now we need to work together, along with the Federal Government to implement a comprehensive, national framework of action to end violence!” NWAC honours the 1181 missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada along with the women at l’École Polytechnique de Montréal. Sadly, we continue to add names to the list of those lost to violence. NWAC has worked with Aboriginal families and communities who have been affected by violence, to raise awareness of the crisis and to develop tools that will assist those who have lost a loved one to violence, and to prevent violence.

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well-being of First Nations and Métis women within Canada. As a national organization representing Aboriginal women since 1974, NWAC’s mandate is to achieve equality for all Aboriginal women in Canada.

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For additional information please contact:

Claudette Dumont Smith, Executive Director
1-800-461-4043 or cdumontsmith@nwac.ca

14.12.04 Violence is still Rampant in Canada

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