PRESS RELEASE –Statistics Canada Launches 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey

January 16, 2017(Ottawa, ON) – Today, Statistics Canada announced the commencement of the 5th cycle of the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). The survey collects information about First Nations people living off-reserve as well as Métis and Inuit people living throughout Canada.

This year’s theme, “Building Sustainable Futures,” focuses on the education and employment of Aboriginal people aged 15 years and over. Information will be gathered on health, language, income, housing, and mobility. Previous cycles of the APS collected data in 1991, 2001, 2006, and 2012 on the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of Aboriginal populations.

The Native Women’s Association of Canada encourages Aboriginal women who are selected to take the survey to participate, as it provides valuable insights into the employment, skills and training, education, and health of Aboriginal women. This information helps inform policy and programming activities that are aimed at improving the well-being of Aboriginal peoples and is an important source of information for a variety of stakeholders including Aboriginal organizations, communities, service providers, researchers, governments, and the general public.

APS collection takes place between January and June 2017. A Statistics Canada interviewer will be contacting approximately 48,000 First Nations people living off-reserve, as well as Métis and Inuit people, either by telephone or in person. Selection is based on who identified themselves as an Aboriginal or as having Aboriginal ancestry in the 2016 Census of Population for Statistics Canada. The results of the survey will be available in the fall of 2018.

Interim NWAC President Francyne D. Joe describes the numbers resulting from these surveys as “a powerful tool for understanding the needs of individuals and communities. NWAC regularly employs statistics when providing recommendations to the House of Commons, to Committees, and anytime we’re asked to lend our expertise. I urge anyone who is given the opportunity to take the survey to help us get an idea of how existing programs are functioning and which new services, programs, community health and social services, and economic opportunities are necessary to improve the quality of life for Aboriginal women and their communities.”

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well-being of First Nations and Métis women within First Nation, Métis and Canadian societies. As a national organization representing Aboriginal women since 1974, NWAC’s mandate is to achieve equality for all Aboriginal women in Canada.

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For more information, please contact:

Lynne Groulx
Executive Director
1 Nicholas Street, 9th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1N 7B7
Toll-free 1-800-461-4043
Tel: 613-722-3033 ext. 223
Email: lgroulx@nwac.ca

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CIHR Institute of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health Announces Dr. Carrie Bourassa as New Scientific Director

January 13, 2017 (Ottawa, ON) – The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) would like to congratulate Dr. Carrie Bourassa on her appointment as Scientific Director of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHRs) Institute of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health. Dr. Bourassa is a member of the Riel Métis Council of Regina Inc. (RMCR, Local #34), who earned her Master of Arts degree in political science and Ph.D. in social studies from the University of Regina.

Chair of Northern & Indigenous Health at the Health Sciences North Research Institute in Sudbury, Dr. Bourassa has worked for 15 years as a professor of Indigenous health studies at the First Nations University of Canada (FNUniv) in Regina. A member of the College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists of the Royal Society of Canada, and the Royal College Council of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, she was previously a member of the CIHR Institutes Advisory Board on Indigenous Peoples’ Health.

Dr. Bourassa will be a leader at CIHR in ensuring better success rates for Indigenous-focused grant applications and developing strategies to train the next generation of Indigenous researchers through capacity building and mentoring.

“Dr. Bourassa’s past work in raising awareness about the impacts of colonization on the health of Indigenous peoples and the need to deliver culturally safe care makes us confident that she will become a strong leader in working towards the health of Indigenous women and girls in Canada,” NWAC Interim President Francyne D. Joe commented.  “Given that Dr. Bourassa has successfully partnered with NWAC’s Pathways PEKE (Partners for Engagement and Knowledge Exchange) in the past, we are very excited to advance future partnerships with herself and the Institute of Aboriginal Peoples Health.”

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For more information, please contact:

Lynne Groulx
Executive Director
1 Nicholas Street, 9th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1N 7B7
Toll free 1-800-461-4043
Tel: 613-722-3033 ext. 223
lgroulx@nwac.ca

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NWAC Releases Report Card on the National Inquiry into MMIWG

January 5, 2017 (Ottawa, ON) – The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) has released their official Report Card on the activities of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (Inquiry).  Drafted to reflect the success of the Inquiry in meeting its directives and mandates as it progresses, NWAC is employing this tool to provide the public with a comprehensive update and in an effort to participate in and actively impact the operations of the inquiry going forward.

“Families and loved ones of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) were discouraged by the lack of communication from the Inquiry following its official date of establishment on September 1st, 2016.  They deserved to have some communication about how and when they could expect to provide their testimonies,” began NWAC President Francyne D. Joe.  “NWAC wants to have a more active voice in constructing strategies that will protect participants at every step of this journey.  It is essential that the Inquiry be sensitive to the trauma experienced by those being interviewed, that those participants feel welcomed as allies, and that the MMIWG are honoured. Having worked with families and survivors, NWAC has experience and knowledge in this area. We recommend working directly with families in shaping how they will be meaningfully engaged in this process.”

The NWAC President commented further about the Report Card, which is to be released quarterly.  “We’ve been very vocal in our concerns regarding the lack of specific guidelines in the Terms of Reference (ToR) of the Inquiry.  The report card gives us a an opportunity to outline the ways in which the Inquiry is successfully implementing their broader ToRs in the areas we’ve found to be potentially problematic.  These include the identification of and actions to remove systemic causes of violence against Indigenous women and girls at a national and provincial level as well as the ability of participants to pursue or reopen individual cases through the justice system.”

“NWAC encourages the Inquiry to be as transparent as possible and to provide families with the resources necessary to access the Commission.  The intent of this Inquiry is not only to bring some semblance of peace to those close to the MMIWG but also to make every Canadian feel like they are taking part in reconciliation,” Joe concluded. “It is our report’s intent to make it accessible to everyone.”

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CONTACT:

Lynne Groulx
Executive Director
1 Nicholas Street, 9th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1N 7B7
Toll-free 1-800-461-4043
Tel: 613-722-3033 ext. 223
Email: lgroulx@nwac.ca

Please follow and like us: