Women Are Not For Sale: The Abolition Of Prostitution

EN ANGLAIS SEULEMENT

PRESS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Ottawa, ON, (March 24th 2014) In December 2013 the Supreme Court of Canada found portions of the criminal laws relating to prostitution unconstitutional and held that the declaration of invalidity was suspended for 12 months to give Parliament an opportunity to put new laws in place. Parliament must respond to this decision in 2014 in a manner consistent with its constitutional and international obligations to protect and promote the equality of women.

We are organizations with decades of experience advocating for the rights of women in Canada. Our member organizations (listed below) provide front line crisis and anti-violence services, representation and advocacy for women and girls who are or have been prostituted, who are criminalized and incarcerated in relation to prostitution, who are trying to escape prostitution, who are targeted for prostitution, and who have been subject to male violence, including prostitution.

Our organizations came together as the Women’s Coalition for the Abolition of Prostitution to intervene in the constitutional challenge and to assert publicly, based on our knowledge and experience, that prostitution is a system of discrimination on the basis of sex, race, poverty and Indigeneity, and a practice of violence against women. We are deeply concerned that the Supreme Court’s decision, while recognizing that women in prostitution face severe danger and limited choices, has the effect of decriminalizing the very johns and profiteers who are the source of the harms and exploitation. We believe that is contrary to the human rights of all women to allow the buying of women’s bodies with impunity and the ability of third parties to profit from that sale. Experience tells us that decriminalizing the demand for prostitution will increase that demand substantially. To meet that demand, the most vulnerable are targeted, including youth, Aboriginal women and girls, and trafficked women. The Women’s Coalition endorses a legal and public policy approach to prostitution that has the following three essential components:

  • strategies to discourage the demand for prostitution, including public education;
  • decriminalization of prostituted persons and criminalization of johns and pimps (with a range of possible sentences); and
  • comprehensive supports to provide women with real alternatives to prostitution including funding for exit programs.

The following members of the Women’s Coalition for the Abolition of Prostitution and allies will be present to speak with the members of the media: Members of the Women’s Coalition for the Abolition of Prostitution: Native Women’s Association of Canada Canadian Association of Sexual Assault Centres Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies Action ontarienne contre la violence faites aux femmes Vancouver Rape Relief and Women’s Shelter Regroupement québécois des centres d’aide et de lutte contre les agressions à caractère sexuel Concertation des luttes contre l’exploitation sexuelle Sextrade 101 Indigenous Women Against the Sex Industry Asian Women Coalition Ending Prostitution EVE – Formerly exploited voices now educating The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well-being of First Nations and Métis women within First Nation, Métis and Canadian societies. As a national organization representing Aboriginal women since 1974, NWAC’s mandate is to achieve equality for all Aboriginal women in Canada.

– 30 –

For additional information please contact:

Kim Pate, Executive Director, CAEFS Tel.: 1-800-637-4606 kpate@web.ca

Claudette Dumont-Smith, NWAC Executive Director Tel.: 1-800-461-4043 cdumontsmith@nwac.ca

14.03.24 Abolition of Prostitution

Please follow and like us:

NWAC Disappointed Once Again by Report Released By Special Parliamentary Committee on VAIW

EN ANGLAIS SEULEMENT

PRESS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Ottawa, ON. (March 7, 2014) The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) wishes to express its’ disappointment and frustration at the report recently released by the Special Parliamentary Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women that was touted to be the panacea for addressing the high rates of violence against Aboriginal women and girls, including their disappearances and murder.

In spite of the call by many witnesses, who appeared before the Committee, to hold a National Public Inquiry and to implement a National Action Plan, their recommendations fail to appear in the Final Report.

“This would have been an opportune time for the Government to demonstrate to all Canadians, and to our International colleagues as well, that it truly is committed to ending all forms of violence against Aboriginal women and girls. This report fails to show the needed commitment and resources to adequately address this ongoing tragedy – a tragedy that is a reflection on Canada as a whole,” said NWAC president, Michele Audette.

Early on, the Special Parliamentary Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women and Girls offered the role of special advisor and expert witness to NWAC but this role fell short of NWAC’s expectations vis-à-vis their participation. Instead, NWAC lobbied the Committee to be granted ex-officio status to assist the Committee in developing its’ work plan, identifying and questioning key witnesses and to participate in developing the final report.

Even as a non-voting member of the Committee, NWAC with its’ extensive knowledge and experience on the issue of violence against women and girls would have been a valuable asset throughout the Committee’s mandate. Consequently, NWAC’s involvement with the Committee has been minimal.

“It truly is unfortunate that this opportunity has been lost; on paper it looks like we are the special advisor and expert witness, but what we received was tokenism and no real engagement,” stated President Audette. “The committee report does contain a few nuggets of hope, but there is no commitment to substantial change and no new funding dollars to ensure appropriate actions are taken. This Committee, like the previous Committee that was established to address violence against Indigenous women and girls, again fails to fully address the issue of violence against Indigenous women, fails the families of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls and, fails the Canadians who want to see this matter resolved once and for all. NWAC is deeply disappointed in this outcome.”

On February 13, 2014 NWAC presented to the Prime Minister’s office more than 23, 000 signatures calling for a National Public Inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada and a National Action Plan to address violence against them. On that same date, the Honorable Carolynn Bennett (LIB) and the Honourable Niki Ashton (NDP) presented the official petition into the House of Commons. All provincial and territorial premiers have indicated support for a National Public Inquiry and National Action Plan. NWAC continues to collect signatures from concerned Canadians calling for an Inquiry. The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well being of First Nations and Métis women within First Nation, Métis and Canadian societies. As a national organization representing Aboriginal women since 1974, NWAC’s mandate is to achieve equality for all Aboriginal women in Canada.

-30-

Contact information:

Claudette Dumont-Smith, NWAC Executive Director
Tel.: 1-800-461-4043
cdumontsmith@nwac.ca

14.03.07 NWAC Disappointed Once again VAIW

Please follow and like us:

NWAC Releases Digital Life Stories

EN ANGLAIS SEULEMENT

PRESS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

March 3, 2014 (OTTAWA) – The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is pleased to announce the release of four new digital life stories, the last in a series of seven, created through the Evidence to Action II project, funded by the Status of Women Canada. These seven digital life stories are in addition to the eleven life stories developed during the Sisters in Spirit initiative that ended in 2010.

The seven digital life stories are based on the family members’ experiences in relation to the justice system, the media, victim services and other support services as they sought and continue to seek justice for their missing or murdered loved one. The digital life stories are a moving tribute to the lives of these women, and serve to raise public awareness, influence positive change and potentially lead to tips that may resolve any outstanding case(s).

“These digital life stories are powerful messages that speak to the tragedy of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada” said NWAC President Michèle Audette. “Not only do they honour the lives of these women and girls, they are an effective tool to educate and inspire the kind of social change in Canada that is required to keep all people safe, and especially those who are most vulnerable and at risk of this kind of violence.”

NWAC Violence Prevention and Safety department through the Evidence to Action II project has been honoured to work with families of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls. NWAC would like to thank the families of Ada Brown, Hilary Bonnell, Maisy Odjick, Claudette Osborne-Tyo, Evangeline Billy, Gladys Simon and Virginia Pictou-Noyes for participating in the digital life storytelling project.

To report a tip call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

-30-

For more information please contact:

Claudette Dumont-Smith, Executive Director
Tel: 613-722-3033 or Toll-free 1-800-461-4043
Email: cdumontsmith@nwac.ca, www.nwac.ca

14.03.03 NWAC Releases Digital Life Stories

Please follow and like us:

Ongoing Tragedy: A National Public Inquiry Is Needed

EN ANGLAIS SEULEMENT

PRESS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 28, 2014 (Ottawa) – The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is reaffirming its’ call for a National Public Inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada as the tragedy continues. Just in the past six months, NWAC has noted that at least eight Aboriginal women have been murdered.

“These statistics should raise the alarm for all Canadians,” stated President, Michèle Audette. Much too frequently, somewhere in Canada, families feel the pain and loss of a loved one who has been a victim of violence. This happens way too often for our Aboriginal people, and to the most vulnerable in our society, the women and girls.”

On behalf of NWAC, President Audette would like to publicly express heartfelt sympathies to the families who have suffered recent losses under such horrible circumstances: Goforth, Kelly Nicole: 21 year old woman found on September 25, 2013 in Regina, SK; Ballantyne, Heather: 40 year old woman found on October 29, 2013 in Pellican Narrows, SK; Desjarlais, Cassandra Joan: 24 year old woman October 31, 2013 in Regina, SK McKinney, Miranda: 50-year-old woman found on November 3, 2013, from Swan Lake, MB Roberts, Jodi: 24 year old woman found on November 27, 2013 near Sucker River, SK; Boisvert, Tricia: 36 year old woman found on January 23, 2014 near Quyon, QC; Gabriel, Rocelyn: 20 year old woman found on January 26, 2014 in Portage la Prairie, MB; Saunders, Loretta, 26 year old found on February 26, 2014 near Salisbury, NB.

Through the five-year Sisters in Spirit initiative (2005 – 2010), NWAC was able to identify 582 missing and/or murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada. Continued tracking of occurrences have indicated that the numbers continue to climb; recent reports now list over 800 incidents of missing or murdered Aboriginal women and girls. On February 14, 2014, NWAC delivered a petition signed by over 23,000 Canadians in support of NWAC’s call for a National Public Inquiry and National Action Plan.

Anyone with information on the above noted cases (or any other case) can leave an anonymous tip to Crime Stoppers by calling toll-free 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

– 30 –

For more information please contact:

Claudette Dumont-Smith, Executive Director
Tel: 613-722-3033 or Toll-free 1-800-461-4043
Email: cdumontsmith@nwac.ca, www.nwac.ca

14.02.28 Ongoing Tragedy

Please follow and like us:

Conférence de presse – L’Association des femmes autochtones du Canada présente des pétitions réclamant la tenue d’une enquête publique nationale sur les femmes autochtones disparues et assassinées

AVIS AUX MÉDIAS

QUOI : Le 13 février 2014, Michèle Audette, présidente de l’Association des femmes autochtones du Canada (AFAC), sera sur la Colline du Parlement pour faire appel au gouvernement du Canada afin de lui remettre plus de 23 000 signatures réclamant la tenue d’une enquête publique nationale sur la question des femmes et des filles autochtones disparues et assassinées.

QUI : Michèle Audette, présidente de l’Association des femmes autochtones du Canada, l’aînée Annie Smith St Georges, des membres de familles éplorées, Lorna Martin, Sue Martin et Gail Nepinak, ainsi que des députées fédérales : la Dre Carolyn Bennett et Niki Ashton

QUAND : Le jeudi 13 février 2014 13 h (HNE)

OÙ : Salle de conférence de presse Charles-Lynch, édifice du Centre 111, rue Wellington, Ottawa (Ontario)

POURQUOI : L’Association des femmes autochtones du Canada (AFAC) remettra au gouvernement du Canada les signatures de plus de 23 000 personnes qui réclament la tenue d’une enquête publique nationale sur la question des femmes et des filles autochtones disparues et assassinées. Dans le cadre de l’initiative Soeurs par l’esprit, qui a duré cinq ans (2005-2010), l’AFAC a documenté près de 600 cas « connus » de femmes et de filles disparues et/ou assassinées. Les résultats de ce travail ont été publiés à des fins de sensibilisation et pour promouvoir l’action dans ce dossier. Selon des recherches plus récentes, il y a maintenant plus de 800 femmes autochtones disparues et/ou assassinées au Canada.

COMMENT : Pour obtenir plus d’information, contacter :
Claudette Dumont Smith, directrice générale
1-800-461-4043 ou cdumontsmith@nwac.ca

14.02.13 Conférence de presse – L’Association des femmes autochtones du Canada présente des pétitions

Please follow and like us:

Des Milliers de Canadiens Réclament la Tenue d’une Enquête Publique Nationale sur les Femmes Autochtones Disparues et Assassinées

COMMUNIQUÉ – PUBLICATION IMMÉDIATE

OTTAWA (Ontario), le 13 février 2014 – L’Association des femmes autochtones du Canada (AFAC) a livré aujourd’hui à la Chambre des communes plus de 23 000 signatures appuyant la position de l’AFAC, qui réclame la tenue d’une enquête publique nationale sur la disparition et le meurtre de plus de 600 femmes et filles autochtones. « C’est une tragédie nationale qu’on ne peut pas ignorer plus longtemps », a dit la présidente, Michèle Audette.

Au cours des deux dernières années, l’AFAC a recueilli 23 088 signatures de Canadiens préoccupés par cette situation, qui veulent que des mesures soient prises pour remédier au taux élevé de femmes et de filles autochtones disparues et assassinées. Les signataires de la pétition réclament la tenue d’une enquête publique nationale, une étape essentielle, selon l’AFAC, en vue de mettre en oeuvre un plan d’action national détaillé et coordonné pour apporter une solution à l’ampleur et à la gravité de la violence à laquelle sont confrontées quotidiennement les femmes et les filles autochtones. Le 13 février 2014 marque le dernier jour des entrevues entendues par les membres du Comité spécial du Parlement sur la violence faite aux femmes autochtones au Canada. Le  Comité spécial a été créé par suite de l’adoption à l’unanimité par la Chambre des communes d’une motion présentée par la députée libérale Carolyn Bennett pour traiter du taux élevé de femmes autochtones assassinées et disparues au pays. Le Comité a entendu de nombreux intervenants, mais n’a pas reconnu à l’AFAC la qualité d’intervenant, comme on l’avait demandé, malgré le fait que celle-ci représente les femmes autochtones de tout le Canada.

« De combien d’autres signatures avons-nous besoin, ou combien d’autres femmes et de filles autochtones doivent-elles disparaître ou être assassinées, pour persuader le gouvernement du Canada qu’une enquête publique nationale s’impose afin d’examiner cette question et de trouver et appliquer des solutions pour mettre fin à cette tragédie nationale. Il est temps d’agir! », a imploré la présidente de l’AFAC, Michèle Audette.

-30-

Pour obtenir plus d’information, contacter :

Claudette Dumont Smith, directrice générale
1-800-461-4043 ou cdumontsmith@nwac.ca

14.02.13 Des Milliers de Canadiens Réclament la Tenue d’une Enquête Publique Nationale

Please follow and like us:

Déclaration commune, le 13 février 2014

L’Association des femmes autochtones du Canada (AFAC) a remis au gouvernement du Canada plus de 23 000 signatures réclamant la tenue d’une enquête publique nationale sur la disparition et le meurtre de femmes et de filles autochtones. Il y a des années que les familles et les communautés éplorées s’efforcent, mais en vain, d’attirer l’attention sur le nombre élevé de femmes et de filles autochtones disparues et assassinées au Canada.

Dans le cadre de l’initiative Soeurs par l’esprit, qui a duré cinq ans (2005-2010), l’AFAC a documenté près de 600 cas « connus » de femmes et de filles autochtones disparues ou assassinées. Les résultats des recherches de l’AFAC ont été publiés et diffusés comme moyen de sensibilisation et de promotion d’un dialogue à ce sujet. Nous poursuivons les travaux en ce sens, et le nombre de femmes et de filles autochtones disparues ou assassinées se chiffre maintenant à plus de 800. L’AFAC est reconnaissante envers les nombreux autres organismes et individus qui continuent de sensibiliser le public à ce grave problème qui est loin d’être résolu. Ensemble, nous collaborons à l’atteinte d’un objectif commun pour dénoncer cette injustice.

Le mouvement de sensibilisation des Canadiens prend de l’essor. La colère monte chez les Premières Nations, les Métis et les Inuits, qui ont recours à leurs propres moyens d’expression et d’appel à l’action. À travers le Canada et sur la scène internationale, des groupes réclament qu’on mette fin à la violence fondée sur le sexe, dans le cadre d’actions collectives comme la journée « Ayez un coeur » de la Société de soutien à l’enfance et à la famille des Premières Nations du Canada, le mouvement « One Billion Rising », des marches commémoratives et la Journée nationale d’action de la Fondation filles d’action.

Il y a un an, l’AFAC lançait une pétition réclamant la tenue d’une enquête publique nationale, à la suite de quoi les signatures et les messages de solidarité ont afflué. Plus de 23 000 signatures ont été recueillies jusqu’ici. Les pétitions seront remises au gouvernement du Canada le 13 février pour marquer le dernier jour d’entrevues du Comité spécial du Parlement sur la violence faite aux femmes autochtones au Canada.

La tenue d’une enquête publique nationale est une étape essentielle en vue de mettre en oeuvre le plan d’action national détaillé et coordonné que réclament l’AFAC et ses nombreux sympathisants. « Comme l’ont répété nos organisations communautaires, cette mesure s’impose pour apporter une solution à l’ampleur et à la gravité de la violence à laquelle sont confrontées quotidiennement les femmes et les filles autochtones. Ensemble, nous réclamons de tous les ordres de gouvernement qu’ils s’engagent et qu’ils agissent », a déclaré Michèle Audette.

En terminant, nous tenons à exprimer notre gratitude et nos sincères remerciements aux familles éplorées; nous les remercions de partager leurs histoires avec nous et pour le leadership dont elles font preuve dans ce mouvement. Vous êtes la raison pour laquelle nous continuons de réclamer de l’action. Nous sommes honorées de cheminer à vos côté dans cette démarche!

Pour obtenir plus d’information au sujet de l’AFAC, contacter :

Claudette Dumont Smith, directrice générale
1-800-461-4043 ou cdumontsmith@nwac.ca

14.02.13 Déclaration commune, le 13 février 2014

Please follow and like us:

L’Association des femmes autochtones du Canada est déçue du budget déposé hier

COMMUNIQUÉ – PUBLICATION IMMÉDIATE

OTTAWA (Ontario), le 12 février 2014 – L’Association des femmes autochtones du Canada (AFAC) était heureuse initialement en apprenant que le nouveau budget fédéral comprenait de nouveaux investissements dans l’examen de la situation des femmes autochtones disparues et assassinées. « Cependant, déclare la présidente de l’AFAC, Mme Michèle Taïna Audette, les montants prévus dans ce budget ne sont pas suffisants pour réduire la violence envers les femmes autochtones en général et sont très loin de répondre à notre demande pour la tenue d’une enquête publique nationale et l’élaboration d’un plan d’action détaillé ».

Le budget fédéral 2014 comprend le renouvellement pour deux ans de la Stratégie de la justice applicable aux Autochtones et des ressources visant à réduire la violence, y compris la violence faite aux femmes et aux filles autochtones. Ces investissements seront utiles pour la prise de mesures communautaires, mais ne feront rien pour contrer le ciblage des femmes et des filles autochtones qui entraîne la disparition et la mort par des délinquants non autochtones, parce que ceux-ci croient que leurs actes ne donneront même pas lieu à des enquêtes. « Les autres investissements, en ce qui concerne l’ADN et d’autres mesures gouvernementales en matière de justice, ne sont pas particuliers aux femmes autochtones. En l’absence d’objectifs spécifiques de réduction de la violence et des meurtres de nos femmes, ces investissements n’auront probablement aucun impact », dit la Mme Michèle Taïna Audette.

Le budget fédéral 2014 déposé par le ministre des Finances, Jim Flaherty, confirme l’octroi d’un nouveau financement de base de 1,25 milliard de dollars à l’appui de l’éducation des Premières Nations de 2016-2017 à 2018-2019, avec un taux de croissance annuel de 4,5 %, et inclut un fonds bonifié pour l’éducation de 160 millions de dollars sur quatre ans à compter de 2015-2016 et 500 millions $ sur sept ans, à partir de 2015-2016, pour la création d’un nouveau fonds pour l’infrastructure éducationnelle des Premières Nations. L’AFAC est satisfaite de l’augmentation du financement global de l’éducation, mais craint qu’aucune mesure ou soutien particuliers ne soient encore une fois prévus pour répondre aux besoins de plus de la moitié de la population autochtone, c’est-à-dire les femmes autochtones, dont un grand nombre sont chefs de familles monoparentales.

Le Plan d’action économique 2014 propose de fournir 36 millions $ sur quatre ans pour renouveler le Programme des ordinateurs pour les écoles, pour que les élèves et les stagiaires aient accès à du matériel de technologies de l’information et des communications ainsi qu’à une formation professionnelle dans ce domaine. Pourtant, seulement 150 000 $ sont attribués à Condition féminine Canada en 2014-2015 pour développer le mentorat parmi les entrepreneures. « C’est totalement inacceptable », de dire Mme Michèle Taïna Audette.

-30-

Pour obtenir plus d’information, contacter :

Claudette Dumont-Smith, directrice générale
Téléphone : 613-722-3033, poste 223
Sans frais : 1-800-461-4043
Courriel : cdumontsmith@nwac.ca

14.02.12 L’Association des femmes autochtones du Canada est déçue du budget déposé hier

 

Please follow and like us: