NWAC Interim President Francyne D. Joe Introduces the 2nd Inquiry Into MMIWG Report Card

Dear Families, Communities, Stakeholders, and Commissioners,

On behalf of the Native Women’s Association of Canada, I would like to present our second Report Card assessing the success of the Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Women and Girls in fulfilling its responsibilities over the past three months.

NWAC has a history of working with families of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls and creating networks of families through a series of projects such as Family Gatherings, Narrative and Digital Storytelling, Sisters In Spirit Vigils, and its premiere research.  We feel a deep responsibility to the families and communities who are at the heart of our work and remain dedicated to producing results and taking actions that we hope can begin to fulfill our duty to the Indigenous women and girls whose interests we represent.

In order to provide feedback that is strength-based, solution-focused, and productive, fairness must be our primary concern.  We have acknowledged our personal connections to this work and applied a critical eye to eliminating any emotional reactions from this document.  Our last Report Card, drafted with minimal information from the Inquiry, called for transparency, communication, and a process that is trauma-informed and culturally sensitive.  It is now our solemn task to identify the areas where this Inquiry has failed and once again appeal to have families come first and for NWAC to be meaningfully consulted in a process in which we are deeply invested.

We are not asking anyone, especially families, to be patient with this Inquiry as it progresses. We are asking that you remain strong and face adversity with the same determination that has made this Inquiry possible. In solidarity, we will not back down until this Inquiry is what we were promised.  To the families and communities, this is your Inquiry to shape and your opportunity to share your stories.  To the stakeholders, this is a chance for healing as a nation and a vital step in the process of decolonization and reconciliation.  To the Commissioners and staff of the Inquiry, the great challenge presented by this work is an impetus to incredible growth and possibility.

I urge you to find your voice in holding this Inquiry accountable and to continue to join us in advocating for a process that reflects our shared values, hopes, and dreams.  We need you to keep writing and signing letters to the Inquiry, holding your own community gatherings, and speaking to the media in order for your stories to be told and your positions to be known. It is my hope that our shared focus may result in an outcome that honours our MMIWG in the way that they deserve and contributes to a future free from violence for the Indigenous women and girls we love.

Sincerely,

Francyne Joe

Interim President, Native Women’s Association of Canada

Your concerns are important. Please email or call us at:

reception@nwac.ca

Telephone: 613.722.3033

Toll-Free: 1.800.461.4043

To make yourself available for contact by the media at your discretion, please contact:

Amy Ede

Director of Communications

Tel: 613-722-3033 ext. 100

Toll-Free: 1.800.461.4043 ext. 100

Email: aede@nwac.ca

Website: www.nwac.ca

Please follow and like us:

NWAC Proposes Three Iconic Indigenous Women for Next Bank of Canada Note

 

 

(April 15, 2016) (Ottawa, ON) – The staff and board of the Native Women’s Association of Canada have collectively determined names of three late iconic Indigenous women to put forward for the open nomination process to add a woman to the next Bank of Canada note.

As the voice of Indigenous women in Canada, NWAC feels that it is our duty to celebrate the powerfully influential role Indigenous women play in our collective history. By showcasing any of the following incredible women, not only would the Bank of Canada be taking a strong step toward reconciliation, this department would be joining our communities in embracing the leadership and resilience of our women.

 

The three women NWAC has selected for submission to the Bank of Canada include:

 

1. E. Pauline Johnson (1861-1913):
Emily Pauline Johnson (Mohawk name: Tekahionwake) was a Mohawk woman from the Six Nations Reserve of Grand River in Ontario. She made a name for herself in the arts as a celebrated writer, poet and performer. Johnson’s work has been published and received wide acclamation across Canada, the United States and Great Britain.

2. Annie Mae Aquash (1945-1975)
Annie Mae Aquash (Mi’kmaq name: Naguset Eask) was a Mi’kmaq woman from Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia. An unwavering advocate for Indigenous empowerment and sovereignty, Aquash was a lifelong activist in the American Indian Movement of the 1970s.

3. Shannen Koostachin (1995-2010)
Shannen Koostachin was a fearless, young Cree activist from Attawapiskat First Nation in northern Ontario. Shannen’s Dream is a Canadian youth-driven movement advocating for equitable education funding for First Nations children that was born out of Koostachin’s activism. Though she does not technically fit the criteria for submission given her untimely passing only 6 years ago, it is NWAC’s belief that Shannen’s spirit, influence and activism have more than earned her a place as a contender.

 

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well-being of First Nations and Métis women within First Nation, Métis and Canadian societies. As a national organization representing Indigenous women since 1974, NWAC’s mandate is to achieve equality for all Indigenous women and girls in Canada.

 

―30―

 

QUOTE:

“In different respective ways, each of these individuals embodies what is so beautiful and powerful about Indigenous women. It is my sincere hope that the Bank of Canada take these impressive women into consideration for the next Bank of Canada note.”
―Dawn Lavell-Harvard, President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada

 

For more information, please contact:

Lynne Groulx
Executive Director
1 Nicholas Street, 9th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1N 7B7
Toll-free 1-800-461-4043
Tel: 613-722-3033 ext. 223
Email: lgroulx@nwac.ca

Please follow and like us:

NWAC President Dawn Lavell-Harvard Participates in Two Key Parallel Events at 2016 UN Commission on Status of Women

 

(March 24, 2016) (NY, NY, United States of America) ― Dawn Lavell-Harvard, President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC), partook in two key parallel events at the 60th United Nations Special Commission on the Status of Women (#CSW60) in New York, New York on Tuesday March 22, 2016.

The first parallel event entitled Indigenous Women’s Empowerment: Combating the Global Epidemic of Murdered & Missing Indigenous Women took an interdisciplinary, cross-generational look at the disproportionate violence Indigenous women and girls face across North America. Fellow panelists included: Dr. Mary Roessel (Navajo) of Santa Fe Indian Hospital; Noel Altaha (Apache) of Columbia University; and Betty M. Lyons (Onondaga) President of the American Indian Law Alliance. This discussion was moderated by Tia Oros Peters (Zuni), Executive Director of Seventh Generation Fund.

The second parallel event was entitled Together We Are Stronger: Indigenous Women’s Movements to End Violence Against American Indian, Alaska Native, and Aboriginal Women. This event was intended to recognize, strengthen, and honour the growing Global movement to end the human rights crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls. Fellow speakers included: Terri Henry, Co-Chair of the National Congress of American Indians Task Force on Violence against Women and Chair of the Indian Law Resource Centre Board of Directors, as well as Tamra Truett Jerue, Director of the Alaska Native Women’s Resource Centre, Tribal Administrator, and Director of Social Services for the Anvik Village Tribal Council.

QUOTE

“It was an honour to participate in each of these critical parallel events during the 60th United Nations Commission on the Status of Women. Crossing Turtle Island to join our sisters near and far is a crucial piece to solving this international epidemic. In order to end violence against Indigenous women and girls, we must continue to work collaboratively – sharing our stories and building strategic, interdisciplinary partnerships. We are stronger together.”
―Dawn Lavell-Harvard, Ph.D., President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well-being of First Nations and Métis women within First Nation, Métis and Canadian societies. As a national organization representing Aboriginal women since 1974, NWAC’s mandate is to achieve equality for all Aboriginal women in Canada.

 

―30―

 

FOR MEDIA REQUESTS OR MORE INFORMATION:

Jenn Jefferys
Native Women’s Association of Canada
+1 613-485-1988
jjefferys@nwac.ca

Please follow and like us:

NWAC President, Dawn Lavell-Harvard, Speaks to Plight of Indigenous Women and Girls in Canada at 2016 UN Commission on Status of Women; Receives Standing Ovation


(March 18, 2016) (New York, NY, United States) – Dawn Lavell-Harvard, President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada, was invited to join the sixtieth session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, which began March 14 and concludes on March 24, 2016 at UN headquarters in New York City.

Yesterday (March 17, 2016), Lavell-Harvard joined an esteemed panel of Indigenous women for a special side-event sponsored by Canada entitled Indigenous Women and Girls: Pathways to Equality. The purpose of this side-event was to examine the underlying factors that contribute to Indigenous women and girls’ abuse, including the longstanding impacts of colonialism, racism and sexism.

Lavell-Harvard’s fellow panelists for this event included Chandra Roy Henriksen, Chief of the Secretariat of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Betty Lyons, President and Executive Director of the American Indian Law Alliance, and Mirna Cunningham Kain, former Chairperson of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. This panel was moderated by Canada’s Minister of Justice and Attorney General, Jody Wilson-Raybould.

Panelists spoke collectively to the ongoing need to provide holistic, Indigenous-led approaches to addressing the ongoing discrimination experienced by Indigenous women and girls, including violence and abuse.

Lavell-Harvard’s remarks explored the unique and complex plight of Indigenous women and girls in Canada, which, despite a new and promising government remains serious and demands action. Lavell-Harvard spoke to the grueling and multi-decade long grassroots effort on the part of the Native Women’s Association of Canada and other groups and individual activists from across Canada who worked tirelessly to draw the attention of the international community to the reality of missing and murdered Indigenous women –ultimately leading to the national inquiry, now underway.
―30―

 

 

QUOTE
“To be born Indigenous and female in a country like Canada means that we are born political. We recognize that Canada has the resources and the infrastructure now to lead the way in ending violence against Indigenous women and girls both domestically and internationally. Though decades of systemic oppression and abuse cannot be reversed overnight, the power of our women can wear away the strongest opposition if we are all united. Together, alongside our international partners, we will end violence against Indigenous women and girls.”
―Dawn Lavell-Harvard, President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT

Jenn Jefferys
Native Women’s Association of Canada
jjefferys@nwac.ca
+1 613-485-1988

Please follow and like us:

NWAC Renews Call for An Immediate Strengthening of Health Services, Resources for Communities Struck by Suicide Epidemic

 

Native Women’s Association of Canada Renews Call for An Immediate Strengthening of Health Services, Resources for Communities Struck by Suicide Epidemic

 

(March 11, 2016) (Ottawa, ON) ― The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is heartbroken over the recent tragedies in the Pimicikamak Cree Nation of Northern Manitoba. We offer our sincere condolences to the community, as well as the families and friends who are grieving the loss of loved ones.

Recent reports of suicide and suicide attempts in Pimicikamak Cree Nation are devastating; however this reality is not an isolated occurrence. According to the First Nations Regional Health Survey 2002/03, 3 in 10 adults (31%) reported having had suicidal thoughts and 1 in 6 (16%) had attempted suicide at some point in their lives. Further, Indigenous women were more likely than men to have attempted suicide (18.5% versus 13.1%).

In 2010, Health Canada reported that the suicide rate among Indigenous youth is estimated to be five to six times higher than that of non-Indigenous youth in Canada. This is a human rights crisis that must be addressed immediately.

NWAC is currently partnered with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research in their Pathways to Health Equity for Aboriginal Peoples initiative, which focuses on moving research into culturally-relevant, gender-appropriate, community-based interventions related to mental health and wellness.

QUOTE:

“Indigenous communities are facing a suicide epidemic. When a member of our community is lost to suicide, particularly a young person, the entire community experiences the repercussions collectively. More robust services are required immediately in our communities to stop these tragedies from reoccurring – that means acknowledging the structural oppression our communities are subjected to, and putting forward stronger services now. Clearly, this epidemic demands immediate action; our communities cannot afford to wait.”
―Dawn Lavell-Harvard, President, Native Women’s Association of Canada

 

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well-being of First Nations and Métis women within First Nation, Métis and Canadian societies. As a national organization representing Aboriginal women since 1974, NWAC’s mandate is to achieve equality for all Aboriginal women in Canada.

 

 

―30―

 

MEDIA CONTACT:
Jenn Jefferys
Native Women’s Association of Canada
jjefferys@nwac.ca
+1 613-722-3033 ext. 235
+1 613-485-1988 (cell)

 

Please follow and like us:

We Are Now Accepting AWBEN 2016 Grant Applications!

Each year, the Aboriginal Women’s Business Entrepreneurship Network is honoured to present two grant opportunities to dynamic and deserving Indigenous women to assist them is starting up their own business.

 

ACCESS AWBEN GRANT INFORMATION HERE

 


Please follow and like us:

NWAC Welcomes ON Government’s New Long-Term Strategy to Curb VAIWG

STATEMENT

 

NWAC Welcomes Ontario Government’s New Long-Term Strategy to Curb Violence Against Indigenous Women and Girls

 

(February 24, 2016) (Ottawa, ON) ― Yesterday, the Government of Ontario  announced a new long-term strategy and investment called Walking Together: Ontario’s Long-Term Strategy to End Violence Against Indigenous Women. The strategy outlines actions to prevent violence against Indigenous women and girls and to reduce its impact on youth, families and communities. Its ultimate goal is to work toward ending violence against Indigenous women and girls.
The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) welcomes this new strategy and the leadership of Premier Kathleen Wynne, and trusts that NWAC and our provincial affiliate; the Ontario Native Women’s Association (ONWA) will be regularly consulted through the course of this long-term strategy.

President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada, Dawn Lavell-Harvard, Ph.D., has issued the following statement in response to this new strategy from the Ontario government:

“Despite our strength and incredible resilience, Indigenous women and girls are subject to blatant systemic oppression and discrimination. To that end, NWAC is hopeful that with this new strategy on the part of the Ontario government ―in tandem with the ongoing national inquiry on the national level― we will begin to see a reduction in violence, fewer missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, less sexism and racism against us, and a more realistic public awareness around the strength and resilience of our women and girls; because we are not vulnerable victims. To the contrary: we are strong, and we deserve respect.”

 

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well-being of First Nations and Métis women within First Nation, Métis and Canadian societies. As a national organization representing Aboriginal women since 1974, NWAC’s mandate is to achieve equality for all Aboriginal women in Canada.

 

 

―30―

 

MEDIA REQUESTS:

Jenn Jefferys
Native Women’s Association of Canada
+1 613-722.3033 ext. 235
+1 613-485-1988 (cell)
jjefferys@nwac.ca

Please follow and like us:

3RD ANNUAL AWBEN CONFERENCE ― FEB 25 IN TORONTO

The Indigenous women’s entrepreneurial event of the year is coming up FAST! Join us February 25 in downtown Toronto for a FREE conference featuring Indigenous business experts from across Canada, who are looking forward to sharing their business insights with you.

AWBENposterFINAL

DOWNLOAD CONFERENCE AGENDA HERE

JOIN THE OFFICIAL FACEBOOK EVENT HERE
(don’t forget to share with your friends & colleagues!)

Please follow and like us:

Symposium Releases 22 Recommendations for National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

PRESS RELEASE  //  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Symposium Hosted by NWAC and FAFIA Releases 22 Recommendations for National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIWG)

 

(February 17, 2016) (Ottawa, ON, Canada) ― The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC), the Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action (FAFIA), and the Canadian Journal of Women and the Law (CJWL) hosted an historic Symposium to discuss the design of the national inquiry into murders and disappearances of Indigenous women and girls on January 30 and 31, 2016 in Ottawa.

This two-day Symposium (titled Murders and Disappearances of Indigenous Women and Girls: Planning for Change – Towards a National Inquiry and an Effective National Action Plan) brought together international human rights experts from the United Nations and the Inter‑American Commission on Human Rights, the White House Advisor on violence against women, Indigenous women leaders, family members, and grassroots feminist activists from across Canada.

From the Symposium’s deliberations emerged 22 recommendations regarding the design of the long-awaited national inquiry – each of which is imperative in order to ensure a fulsome, pragmatic, objective, and ultimately, successful outcome for this national inquiry.

The 22 inquiry recommendations set out the need for:

  • a clear focus on gendered and racialized violence against Indigenous women and girls;
  • the critical importance of addressing the harms to family members caused by the violence and of supporting family members through redress, healing, ceremony, memorialization, and compensation;
  • clarifying at the outset that the inquiry is national in scope and will include scrutiny of conduct and policies in federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions;
  • including examination of 1) failures in policing and the justice system and 2) the underlying social and economic inequality of Indigenous women and girls that permits and perpetuates the violence.
  • Establishing a human rights framework for the inquiry, that will ensure that recommendations already made by the United Nations and the Inter‑American Commission are implemented, and that proposed solutions are measured against human rights standards.

Dawn Lavell-Harvard, President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada said: “Gendered, sexualized and racialized violence against Indigenous women and girls violates our commitments to equality and causes lasting inter-generational harm to families, communities. These 22 recommendations establish the measures necessary to address this crisis effectively and to begin to reverse the cycle of violence.”

 

ACCESS FULL SYMPOSIUM OUTCOME DOCUMENT WITH 22 RECOMMENDATIONS HERE

 

 

QUOTES

 

“The Western patriarchal paradigm paints Indigenous women as vulnerable; unworthy of value or respect. We know better. We know that we as lifegivers are strong, resilient, and capable of great things. This document is proof of that. It’s time to move forward – out of the darkness and into the light. The road ahead will be grueling, but it is nothing we can’t handle if we remain focused and committed to our overarching purpose: bringing justice to our women and girls.”
―Dawn Lavell-Harvard, President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada

 

“It is essential that the national inquiry have a human rights framework. Canada needs to implement, and then build on, the recommendations from the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and the Inter‑American Commission on Human Rights. We need to ensure that the national plan that emerges from the inquiry will move us towards fulfilling the rights of Indigenous women and girls and meet the obligations of Canadian governments.”
―Shelagh Day, Chair, Human Rights Committee, Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action (FAFIA)

 

“The Symposium identified the crux of this issue – that equality will never be achieved until gendered, racialized and sexualized violence against Indigenous women and girls as perpetrated by both Indigenous and non-Indigenous men, and by representatives of the state, is stopped. That requires action by all levels of government in Canada.”
―Angela Cameron, Associate Professor, Faculty of Law at University of Ottawa and board member for the Feminist Alliance for International Action (FAFIA)

 
―30―

 

 

For more information or for media inquiries, please contact:
Jenn Jefferys
Native Women’s Association of Canada
jjefferys@nwac.ca
+1 613-722-3033 ext. 235
+1 613-485-1988 (cell)

Please follow and like us:

NWAC Stands with Downtown Eastside Today During 26th Annual Women’s Memorial March

NWAC Stands with Downtown Eastside Today During 26th Annual Women’s Memorial March


(February 14, 2016) (Ottawa, ON/Vancouver, BC)
― Today, for the 26th consecutive year, the Annual Women’s Memorial March for missing and murdered Indigenous women took place on Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. This march is held to honour the memory of all those who have died due to physical, mental, emotional and spiritual violence in the region.

The Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, British Columbia has seen some of the most horrific violence against Indigenous women and girls in the country. As a result of police inaction, racism, sexism, poverty and socio-economic structures which continue to disproportionately disadvantage Indigenous women and girls, the Downtown Eastside has seen more than 100 Indigenous women murdered. This is unacceptable.

Dawn Lavell-Harvard, President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada, says: “Twenty-six years ago, rather than succumbing to grief, grassroots feminist activists boldly took to the streets to honour these stolen sisters from the Downtown Eastside. Today, we will continue to march on in a way that only Indigenous women can. NWAC is proud to stand with you. Thank you for your unwavering grace and strength amid this sorrow. My heart is with you.”

Nikki Fraser, Western Youth Representative for the Native Women’s Association of Canada, says: “Today, both here in BC and across Canada, we must look to our Elders and our traditions, and refocus our efforts to end violence against our sisters. We must ensure that our daughters do not have to witness these tragedies reoccur.”

NWAC will continue to put pressure on the federal government to ensure the forthcoming national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women provides healing and justice to every region of this country where families are touched by these tragedies – the Downtown Eastside included.

NWAC’s thoughts and prayers are with the families (both within and beyond bloodlines) yearning for peace and reconciliation amid these tragedies. We hope that your hearts might know peace today. Together – we will achieve justice.

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well-being of First Nations and Métis women within First Nations, Métis and Canadian societies. As a national organization representing Indigenous women since 1974, NWAC’s mandate is to achieve equality for all Indigenous women in Canada.

 
―30―

 

For more information or for media inquiries:

Jenn Jefferys
Communications Officer
Native Women’s Association of Canada
+1 613-485-1988 (cell)
jjefferys@nwac.ca

Please follow and like us:

Nikki Fraser, Western Regional Youth Representative for NWAC, One of Ten Canadians Chosen by CBC to Interview the Prime Minister

a


(January 31, 2016) (Ottawa, ON) ― Nikki Fraser is not your typical 25 year-old. She’s a mover and a shaker, a mother of two, an Indigenous woman from Tk’emlups Te Secwepemc (one of the 17 bands within the Secwepemc Nation) – and she’s our Regional Youth Representative for the West here at the Native Women’s Association of Canada.

Between her story, her warmth and her tenacity, and her tireless commitment toward ending violence against Indigenous women and girls, Nikki caught our eye at NWAC long ago. Now, Nikki has also captured the attention of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation – and the entire country.

Nikki was invited to travel all the way from her home province of British Columbia to partake in CBC’s segment: “Face to Face with the Prime Minister” in Ottawa – which aired tonight (January 31, 2016) on The National.

Nikki was one of ten Canadians individually selected for this segment from across the country, for a one-on-one meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Nikki and the other nine individuals selected were given the opportunity to interview the Prime Minister on a topic of their choosing – and that topic for Nikki was missing and murdered Indigenous women.

Congratulations, Nikki!
QUOTES

 

“I do this work in honour of my Aunty Dorothy and my cousin Samantha, and the other beautiful Indigenous women and girls stolen from our nation. Despite the harsh reality that I and so many other young Indigenous ladies live, I will continue to honour them and seek justice.”
-Nikki Fraser, NWAC Regional Youth Representative for Western Canada

“Nikki has an incomparable energy about her. We are so grateful to have her, and so proud of her for fearlessly bringing this issue directly before the Prime Minister. Everyone at NWAC applauds you Nikki for your bravery and unwavering commitment to the cause. You are an inspiration to women and girls everywhere – Indigenous and non-Indigenous alike.”
-Dawn Lavell-Harvard, President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada

 

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well-being of First Nations and Métis women within First Nation, Métis and Canadian societies. As a national organization representing Aboriginal women since 1974, NWAC’s mandate is to achieve equality for all Aboriginal women in Canada. To make a donation to NWAC, please visit nwac.ca.

 

 

―30―

 

For more information, please contact:

Lynne Groulx
Executive Director
1 Nicholas Street, 9th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1N 7B7
Toll-free 1-800-461-4043
Tel: 613-722-3033 ext. 223
Email: lgroulx@nwac.ca

Please follow and like us:

NWAC Senior Manager of Violence Prevention and Safety, Gail Gallagher, Awarded Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship

NWAC Senior Manager of Violence Prevention and Safety, Gail Gallagher, Awarded Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship


The Native Women’s Association of Canada asks that you join us in congratulating our Senior Manager of Violence Prevention and Safety, Gail Gallagher, who has been awarded a substantial academic scholarship from the University of Alberta.

 

Ms. Gallagher is a proud First Nations Cree woman from Frog Lake First Nation, Alberta, who currently resides in the Nation’s capital. Currently, Gail is in her last year of her Masters’ degree with the Native Studies Faculty at the University of Alberta.

 

Her thesis focuses on the sexual exploitation and marginalization of Aboriginal women and ways that Aboriginal activism works to reduce this – critical subject matter that will not only continue to benefit her expertise in her role at NWAC, but will also contribute to the growing body academic research into the issue of Indigenous women’s social, economic and cultural inequality in Canada.
“The Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship for Masters level work is an outstanding achievement,” says NWAC Executive Director, Claudette Dumont-Smith. “I ask that all NWAC staff, board members and friends across Canada join me in congratulating Ms. Gallagher today on this extraordinary achievement. Gail’s work will undoubtedly inspire more Native women like her to succeed academically.”

 

Prior to her employment as the Senior Manager of Violence Prevention & Safety with the Native Women’s Association of Canada, Gail earned extensive work experience through building partnerships and relationships at the federal, provincial and First Nations regional levels.

 

Congratulations, Gail!

 

For more information, please contact:

Lynne Groulx
Executive Director
1 Nicholas Street, 9th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1N 7B7
Toll-free 1-800-461-4043
Tel: 613-722-3033 ext. 223
Email: lgroulx@nwac.ca

Please follow and like us: