More than Invisible, Invisible to Real Action : NWAC’s response to the Special Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women (SCVAIW)

“This would have been an opportune time for the Government to demonstrate to all Canadians, and to our International colleagues as well, that it truly is committed to ending all forms of violence against Aboriginal women and girls. This report fails to show the needed commitment and resources to adequately address this ongoing tragedy – a tragedy that is a reflection on Canada as a whole.” NWAC president, Michèle Audette (March 2014).

Founded in 1974, the Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is a national organization representing Aboriginal women with the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well being of First Nations and Métis women within First Nation, Métis and Canadian societies. The NWAC is the only national Aboriginal organization with a department solely focussed on addressing violence prevention and safety for Aboriginal women and girls in Canada. The NWAC and its Provincial and Territorial Member Associations (PTMAs) has worked tirelessly with Aboriginal women and girls from all walks of life all over Turtle Island with the premise of supporting and ensuring the continuation of our Nations, seven generations into the future. This dedication and commitment to family and community is now forty years strong and carries with it the respect, devotion, and integrity that can only be gained through relationship building, trust, and shared experiences.

NWAC has been addressing the issue of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada for many years and remains deeply concerned that this issue is far from being resolved. NWAC documented 582 cases of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada through the Sisters In Spirit project, which ended in 2010; however, we continue to hear of “new” cases of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls from various regions in Canada. Just recently, research carried out by an Ottawa University Doctoral candidate, revealed that number to be well over 800. NWAC is the only organization to have systemically collected data on this issue and in doing so, was able to identify the many factors and commonalities that put these women and girls at risk.

The ground-breaking work undertaken by NWAC has led to much needed attention right across Canada on the issue of missing and murdered people in general. This has resulted in an increased awareness right across the board, added political will and new initiatives that led to key justice actions such as the National Centre for Missing Persons and Unidentified Remains. It has also led to specific responses to issues such as trafficking of people in Canada, a topic that had previously not been addressed.

NWAC has been and continues to support all initiatives and actions that address the safety and victim needs of all Canadians, regardless of ethnicity. Nevertheless, it should be noted that the resulting Government actions are not specific to Aboriginal women and girls, who, it has been proven, are at a greater risk of experiencing all forms of violence, including being murdered. This government has been quite adamant that they are well aware of the root causes of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada, yet they have cut funding and resources for initiatives that specifically serve this vulnerable population.

On February 14, 2013, Dr. Carolyn Bennett, Member of Parliament for St. Paul’s, presented a Motion to the House of Commons to strike a Special Committee on the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women in Canada. This Motion was unanimously passed in the House of Commons on February 26, 2013. At this time, NWAC supported the concept of a committee to begin addressing the issue as an important first step in laying the ground work and foundation that would naturally have led to the recommendation of a National Public Inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls or a National Action Plan to address violence against Aboriginal women and girls. NWAC did not see the establishment of the committee as a replacement for a full-scale national public commission of inquiry and a national action plan for Aboriginal women. It is unfortunate that these two key elements were not presented as recommendations when the Committee tabled its report on March 6, 2014.

NWAC was concerned from the onset that without the expressed and complete inclusion of Aboriginal women and the expertise that could only be provided by National Aboriginal Organizations (NAOs) representatives, notably the NWAC, the committee would fall short of its’ mandate. The socio-economic issues in conjunction with the racialized and sexualized violence experienced by Aboriginal women and girls is a complex and challenging issue that is best addressed and known by those who directly experience it.

Early on, the NWAC offered its’ expertise and full involvement throughout the Committee’s deliberations. The NWAC sought ex-officio, non-voting membership status such as that given with the Penner Commission. The Penner Commission1 enabled non-parliamentary members to participate fully in the parliamentary committee, and provided them with the ability to participate in the committee work plan, witness list, questioning of witnesses, travel with the committee members, and develop the final report.

This request was denied. Instead the Committee responded by way of a motion in November 2013 granting NWAC “expert advisor” and “expert witness” status; but failed to provide NWAC with the necessary materials to action the motion. It is important to note that the Committee had already held 9 out of 20 meetings it had planned and was working on the final theme of the work plan before the preparing the final report. The NWAC was not provided with the SCVAIW work plan, witness list, committee budget, or other internal documents or resources to facilitate real engagement, inclusion and participation.

NWAC believes that the SCVAIW’s offer to appear before the committee as an “expert advisor” and “expert witness” was meant to pacify NWAC and reduce negative public and media criticism. It is unfortunate that in the Committee’s final report NWAC is accused of failing its role, when the NWAC had offered its’ expertise and full participation in every aspect of the Committee’s work but this was relegated to that of being an expert advisor/witness by the Committee. NWAC fully expected, in the very least, after the passing of the motion to enable NWAC’s role of “expert advisor” and “expert witness” that meetings would be held to strategize on how best to address the issue of violence against Aboriginal women and girls in relation to the mandate of the SCVAIW. As indicated, no sharing of information to NWAC was provided which placed NWAC in the precarious situation of appearing to “rubber stamp” the work and final report of the committee without having fully been engaged.

The SCVAIW met for the first time on 26 March 2013, and organized its study along three main themes: violence and its root causes, front-line assistance, and preventing violence against Aboriginal women and girls, and shortly thereafter developed their witness list based on these themes. The NWAC and other Aboriginal organizations were not asked to provide input into the development of the Committee’s work plan or witness list, nor was any information provided that outlined how and why these particular themes were developed.

The SCVAIW held 20 meetings in total, hearing from 62 witnesses, 15 of which were family members. Through NWAC’s commitment and effort, the Committee was able to hear from family members of murdered Aboriginal women the special session held on December 9, 2013. By coincidence, the NWAC had convened its annual Family Gathering on that particular weekend, bringing together dozens of family members of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls to Ottawa. The SCVAIW wanted to hear from family members about their personal experiences and requested NWAC’s assistance in this regard. Even though NWAC felt shut out to the Committee process, NWAC assisted in organizing the dialogue session between the Committee and the family members.

The SCVAIW membership included seven members from the Conservative Party, four members from the NDP, and one member from the Liberal Party. All members from the Conservative party were Parliamentary Secretaries, except for the Chair. While the use of Parliamentary Secretaries can be beneficial in many ways, it can also be problematic for a number of reasons; such as that Government witnesses would be less likely to speak critically about their department’s work and would opt instead to highlight the current government initiatives. In addition they would be less likely to oppose the current government’s stance on a National Inquiry on missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls and national action plan on ending violence against Aboriginal women and girls.

The SCVAIW’s final report and its recommendations did not include the call for a National Public Inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls and a National Action Plan to address violence against Aboriginal women and girls. Of the 16 recommendations provided by the Committee, only five refer specifically to Aboriginal women and girls. The recommendations are primarily general in nature and support existing initiatives and actions that correspond to current Government priorities. Further, there are no concrete actions that will immediately respond to the needs of Aboriginal women and girls who are most at risk and to families of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls who need access to support services and resources. Indeed, one may perceive that the overall flavour of the report places the onus and blame on Aboriginal people alone.

It is interesting to note that within the SCVAIW report, there is no mention of the impacts of colonization and the need for real and comprehensive reconciliation. Healing cannot be a one sided affair, as it leads to victim blaming, discrimination, and racism. The systemic issues and root causes that impede healthy life-sustaining progress for Aboriginal people needs to be fully recognized. It could be said, that the SCVAIW itself has demonstrated how these systemic issues and root causes present themselves by virtue of their interactions with the NWAC and its paternalistic approach to engagement. It is a great shame that the Committee convened to undertake such important work would be the same Committee that acted as the barrier to the success of its own work. The most natural conclusion to this work should have been a call to real action by way of a national inquiry and action plan. The NWAC is fearful that the SCVAIW’s report is simply that, another report to collect dust, another year of non-action by this Government, and how many lives have been lost during this time? Where are the real solutions, the real actions promised when this committee was first established? Why are there more general actions offered – but none specific to addressing our real needs as Aboriginal women? What do these recommendations offer the families of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls?\

NWAC Recommends:

  • That a National Public Commission of Inquiry be held on the issue of Missing And Murdered Aboriginal Women And Girls In Canada;
  • That a National Action Plan to Address Violence Against Aboriginal Women and Girls be established;
  • That a yearly forum be held to inform and educate Canadians, service providers, educators, policing agencies, policy and program managers, directors, leaders, and politicians on the issue of violence against Aboriginal women and girls and missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls. Further that a special segment of this forum include convening family representatives of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls to ensure their voices are heard and that solutions to address their unique circumstances be developed;
  • That Special Ministerial funding is set aside to revive and update the NWAC Sisters In Spirit Database and that funding be allocated for research on the incidence and prevalence of violence against Aboriginal women and girls.

The SCVAIW report included dissenting reports from both the NDP and Liberal parties. The NWAC supports the dissenting reports as tabled.

14.03.26 NWAC Official Response to SCVAIW

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Women Are Not For Sale: The Abolition Of Prostitution

PRESS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Ottawa, ON, (March 24th 2014) In December 2013 the Supreme Court of Canada found portions of the criminal laws relating to prostitution unconstitutional and held that the declaration of invalidity was suspended for 12 months to give Parliament an opportunity to put new laws in place. Parliament must respond to this decision in 2014 in a manner consistent with its constitutional and international obligations to protect and promote the equality of women.

We are organizations with decades of experience advocating for the rights of women in Canada. Our member organizations (listed below) provide front line crisis and anti-violence services, representation and advocacy for women and girls who are or have been prostituted, who are criminalized and incarcerated in relation to prostitution, who are trying to escape prostitution, who are targeted for prostitution, and who have been subject to male violence, including prostitution.

Our organizations came together as the Women’s Coalition for the Abolition of Prostitution to intervene in the constitutional challenge and to assert publicly, based on our knowledge and experience, that prostitution is a system of discrimination on the basis of sex, race, poverty and Indigeneity, and a practice of violence against women.

We are deeply concerned that the Supreme Court’s decision, while recognizing that women in prostitution face severe danger and limited choices, has the effect of decriminalizing the very johns and profiteers who are the source of the harms and exploitation. We believe that is contrary to the human rights of all women to allow the buying of women’s bodies with impunity and the ability of third parties to profit from that sale. Experience tells us that decriminalizing the demand for prostitution will increase that demand substantially. To meet that demand, the most vulnerable are targeted, including youth, Aboriginal women and girls, and trafficked women.

The Women’s Coalition endorses a legal and public policy approach to prostitution that has the following three essential components:

  • strategies to discourage the demand for prostitution, including public education;
  • decriminalization of prostituted persons and criminalization of johns and pimps (with a range of possible sentences); and
  • comprehensive supports to provide women with real alternatives to prostitution including funding for exit programs.

The following members of the Women’s Coalition for the Abolition of Prostitution and allies will be present to speak with the members of the media:

Members of the Women’s Coalition for the Abolition of Prostitution:

Native Women’s Association of Canada
Canadian Association of Sexual Assault Centres
Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies
Action ontarienne contre la violence faites aux femmes
Vancouver Rape Relief and Women’s Shelter
Regroupement québécois des centres d’aide et de lutte contre les agressions à caractère sexuel
Concertation des luttes contre l’exploitation sexuelle
Sextrade 101
Indigenous Women Against the Sex Industry
Asian Women Coalition Ending Prostitution
EVE – Formerly exploited voices now educating

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well-being of First Nations and Métis women within First Nation, Métis and Canadian societies. As a national organization representing Aboriginal women since 1974, NWAC’s mandate is to achieve equality for all Aboriginal women in Canada.

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For additional information please contact:

Kim Pate, Executive Director, CAEFS
Tel.: 1-800-637-4606
kpate@web.ca

Claudette Dumont-Smith, NWAC Executive Director
Tel.: 1-800-461-4043
cdumontsmith@nwac.ca

14.03.24 Abolition of Prostitution

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NWAC Disappointed Once Again by Report Released By Special Parliamentary Committee on VAIW

PRESS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Ottawa, ON. (March 7, 2014) The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) wishes to express its’ disappointment and frustration at the report recently released by the Special Parliamentary Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women that was touted to be the panacea for addressing the high rates of violence against Aboriginal women and girls, including their disappearances and murder. In spite of the call by many witnesses, who appeared before the Committee, to hold a National Public Inquiry and to implement a National Action Plan, their recommendations fail to appear in the Final Report.

“This would have been an opportune time for the Government to demonstrate to all Canadians, and to our International colleagues as well, that it truly is committed to ending all forms of violence against Aboriginal women and girls. This report fails to show the needed commitment and resources to adequately address this ongoing tragedy – a tragedy that is a reflection on Canada as a whole,” said NWAC president, Michele Audette

Early on, the Special Parliamentary Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women and Girls offered the role of special advisor and expert witness to NWAC but this role fell short of NWAC’s expectations vis-à-vis their participation. Instead, NWAC lobbied the Committee to be granted ex-officio status to assist the Committee in developing its’ work plan, identifying and questioning key witnesses and to participate in developing the final report. Even as a non-voting member of the Committee, NWAC with its’ extensive knowledge and experience on the issue of violence against women and girls would have been a valuable asset throughout the Committee’s mandate. Consequently, NWAC’s involvement with the Committee has been minimal.

“It truly is unfortunate that this opportunity has been lost; on paper it looks like we are the special advisor and expert witness, but what we received was tokenism and no real engagement,” stated President Audette. “The committee report does contain a few nuggets of hope, but there is no commitment to substantial change and no new funding dollars to ensure appropriate actions are taken. This Committee, like the previous Committee that was established to address violence against Indigenous women and girls, again fails to fully address the issue of violence against Indigenous women, fails the families of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls and, fails the Canadians who want to see this matter resolved once and for all. NWAC is deeply disappointed in this outcome.”

On February 13, 2014 NWAC presented to the Prime Minister’s office more than 23, 000 signatures calling for a National Public Inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada and a National Action Plan to address violence against them. On that same date, the Honorable Carolynn Bennett (LIB) and the Honourable Niki Ashton (NDP) presented the official petition into the House of Commons. All provincial and territorial premiers have indicated support for a National Public Inquiry and National Action Plan. NWAC continues to collect signatures from concerned Canadians calling for an Inquiry. The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well being of First Nations and Métis women within First Nation, Métis and Canadian societies. As a national organization representing Aboriginal women since 1974, NWAC’s mandate is to achieve equality for all Aboriginal women in Canada.

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Contact information:

Claudette Dumont-Smith, NWAC Executive Director

Tel.: 1-800-461-4043

cdumontsmith@nwac.ca

14.03.07 NWAC Disappointed Once again VAIW

 

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NWAC Releases Digital Life Stories

PRESS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

March 3, 2014 (OTTAWA) – The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is pleased to announce the release of four new digital life stories, the last in a series of seven, created through the Evidence to Action II project, funded by the Status of Women Canada. These seven digital life stories are in addition to the eleven life stories developed during the Sisters in Spirit initiative that ended in 2010.

The seven digital life stories are based on the family members’ experiences in relation to the justice system, the media, victim services and other support services as they sought and continue to seek justice for their missing or murdered loved one. The digital life stories are a moving tribute to the lives of these women, and serve to raise public awareness, influence positive change and potentially lead to tips that may resolve any outstanding case(s).

“These digital life stories are powerful messages that speak to the tragedy of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada” said NWAC President Michèle Audette. “Not only do they honour the lives of these women and girls, they are an effective tool to educate and inspire the kind of social change in Canada that is required to keep all people safe, and especially those who are most vulnerable and at risk of this kind of violence.”

NWAC Violence Prevention and Safety department through the Evidence to Action II project has been honoured to work with families of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls. NWAC would like to thank the families of Ada Brown, Hilary Bonnell, Maisy Odjick, Claudette Osborne-Tyo, Evangeline Billy, Gladys Simon and Virginia Pictou-Noyes for participating in the digital life storytelling project.

To report a tip call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

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For more information please contact:

Claudette Dumont-Smith, Executive Director
Tel: 613-722-3033 or Toll-free 1-800-461-4043
Email: cdumontsmith@nwac.ca, www.nwac.ca

14.03.03 NWAC Releases Digital Life Stories

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Ongoing Tragedy: A National Public Inquiry Is Needed

PRESS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 28, 2014 (Ottawa) – The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is reaffirming its’ call for a National Public Inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada as the tragedy continues. Just in the past six months, NWAC has noted that at least eight Aboriginal women have been murdered. “These statistics should raise the alarm for all Canadians,” stated President, Michèle Audette. Much too frequently, somewhere in Canada, families feel the pain and loss of a loved one who has been a victim of violence. This happens way too often for our Aboriginal people, and to the most vulnerable in our society, the women and girls.” On behalf of NWAC, President Audette would like to publicly express heartfelt sympathies to the families who have suffered recent losses under such horrible circumstances:

Goforth, Kelly Nicole: 21 year old woman found on September 25, 2013 in Regina, SK;

Ballantyne, Heather: 40 year old woman found on October 29, 2013 in Pellican Narrows, SK;

Desjarlais, Cassandra Joan: 24 year old woman October 31, 2013 in Regina, SK

McKinney, Miranda: 50-year-old woman found on November 3, 2013, from Swan Lake, MB

Roberts, Jodi: 24 year old woman found on November 27, 2013 near Sucker River, SK;

Boisvert, Tricia: 36 year old woman found on January 23, 2014 near Quyon, QC;

Gabriel, Rocelyn: 20 year old woman found on January 26, 2014 in Portage la Prairie, MB;

Saunders, Loretta, 26 year old found on February 26, 2014 near Salisbury, NB.

Through the five-year Sisters in Spirit initiative (2005 – 2010), NWAC was able to identify 582 missing and/or murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada. Continued tracking of occurrences have indicated that the numbers continue to climb; recent reports now list over 800 incidents of missing or murdered Aboriginal women and girls.

On February 14, 2014, NWAC delivered a petition signed by over 23,000 Canadians in support of NWAC’s call for a National Public Inquiry and National Action Plan.

Anyone with information on the above noted cases (or any other case) can leave an anonymous tip to Crime Stoppers by calling toll-free 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

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For more information please contact:
Claudette Dumont-Smith, Executive Director
Tel: 613-722-3033 or Toll-free 1-800-461-4043
Email: cdumontsmith@nwac.ca, www.nwac.ca

14.02.28 Ongoing Tragedy

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Press Conference – Native Women’s Association of Canada Presents Petitions for a National Public Inquiry into Murdered and Missing Aboriginal Women

MEDIA ADVISORY

WHAT: On February 13, 2014, Michèle Audette, President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC), will be on Parliament Hill to call on the Government of Canada to acknowledge and receive more than 23,000 signatures calling for a National Public Inquiry into the matter of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls.

WHO: Michèle Audette, President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada; ElderAnnie Smith St Georges; family members, Lorna Martin, Sue Martin and Gail Nepinak; and, Members of Parliament: Dr. Carolyn Bennett and Niki Ashton

WHEN: February 13, 2014 1:00 p.m. (EST)

WHERE: Charles Lynch Press Conference Room, Centre Block 111 Wellington St. Ottawa, ON

WHY: The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) will deliver over 23,000 signatures to the Government of Canada calling for a National Public Inquiry into the matter of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls. NWAC has documented, through the five-year Sisters in Spirit Initiative (2005-2010), nearly 600 ‘known’ cases of missing and/or murdered Aboriginal women and girls. The results of their findings have been published to educate and promote action to address this issue. More recent research findings indicate that the number of missing and/or
murdered Aboriginal women in Canada is over 800.

HOW: For additional information, please contact:

Claudette Dumont Smith, Executive Director
1-800-461-4043 or cdumontsmith@nwac.ca

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14.02.13 Media Advisory Petition Press Conference

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Thousands of Canadians Call For a National Public Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women

PRESS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 13, 2014 (Ottawa, ON) – The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) delivered over 23,000 signatures today to the House of Commons in support of NWAC’s call for a National Public Inquiry into the more than 600 missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls. “This is a national tragedy that can no longer be ignored,” said President Michèle Audette. Over the past two years NWAC has collected 23,088 signatures from concerned Canadians demanding an end to the high rate of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls. The petition calls for a National Public Inquiry, which NWAC believes to be a crucial step in implementing a comprehensive and coordinated National Action Plan to address the scale and severity of violence faced by Aboriginal women and girls on a daily basis.

February 13, 2014, marks the last day of interviews being heard by the members of the Special Parliamentary Committee into Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women in Canada. The Special Parliamentary Committee was created by a Motion presented by Liberal MP Carolyn Bennett to specifically examine the high rate of murdered and missing Indigenous women and was unanimously passed through the House of Commons. The Committee has heard from multiple stake-holders, however they did not grant intervener status to NWAC, the organization that represents Aboriginal women across Canada as requested.

“How many more signatures do we need or how many more Aboriginal women and girls need to go missing or be murdered before we convince the Government of Canada that a National Public Inquiry is needed to examine this issue and implement solutions to bring an end to this national tragedy. The time for action is now! ” implored NWAC President Michèle Audette.

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For more information on NWAC please contact:

Claudette Dumont Smith, Executive Director
1-800-461-4043 or cdumontsmith@nwac.ca

 

14.02.13 Canadians Call for National Public Inquiry

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Joint Statement on February 13th For A National Public Inquiry Into MMAW

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) delivered more than 23,000 signatures to the Government of Canada to call for a National Public Inquiry into the missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls. For years, families and communities have called attention to the high numbers of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada to no avail.

NWAC has documented, through the five-year Sisters in Spirit Initiative (2005-2010), nearly 600 ‘known’ cases of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls. NWAC’s research findings have been published and distributed as means to educate and promote dialogue. The tracking of those gone missing and/or murdered continues on, with the number of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls increasing to over 800. NWAC is grateful that many other organizations and individuals continue to raise awareness of this serious and ongoing matter. Together, we are working towards a common goal to address this injustice.

Momentum among Canadians continues to build. First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples are rising up and embracing their own forms of expression and their own calls for action. Across Canada and internationally groups are calling for an end to gender-based violence through movements such as the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society Have a Heart Day, 1 Billion Rising, Memorial Marches and the Girls Action Foundation National Day of Action.

A year ago, NWAC launched a petition calling for a National Public Inquiry. Signatures as well as messages of solidarity poured in. More than 23,000 signatures were collected thus far. The petitions will be submitted to the Government of Canada on February 13th, to mark the final day of interviews of the Special Parliamentary Committee into the matter of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women in Canada.

A National Public Inquiry would be a crucial step in implementing a comprehensive and coordinated National Action Plan, which is what NWAC and their many supporters are calling for. “As our community organizations have repeatedly urged, such a response is necessary to address the scale and severity of violence faced by Aboriginal women and girls. Together, we demand action and secure commitments from all levels of government,” stated Michele Audette.

In closing, we express our sincere thanks and gratitude to the families; we thank them for sharing their stories and for their leadership in this movement. You are the reason we continue to demand action. We are honored to walk beside you on this journey!

For more information on NWAC please contact:

Claudette Dumont Smith, Executive Director
1-800-461-4043 or cdumontsmith@nwac.ca

14.02.13 Joint Statement on February 13 for National Public Inquiry

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Native Women’s Association of Canada Disappointed in Yesterday’s Budget Announcement

PRESS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 12, 2014 Ottawa, ON – The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) was initially pleased to hear about the announcement regarding new investments into addressing the situation of missing and murdered Aboriginal women in the new federal budget but, “this budget does not go far enough to address violence against Aboriginal women in general and falls far behind our position of calling for a National Public Inquiry and Comprehensive Action Plan,’ stated President Michèle Taïna Audette.

The 2014 federal budget includes a two-year renewal of the Aboriginal Justice Strategy and resources aimed at ending violence, including violence against Indigenous women and girls. Although these will be helpful for community measures, these investments will do nothing to address the targeting of Aboriginal women and girls leading to their disappearances and deaths by non-Aboriginal offenders because they believe their actions will go uninvestigated. “The other investments into DNA and other government justice measures are not specific to Aboriginal women, and without specific goals to reduce violence and murders of our women, it is unlikely to make an impact,” stated Michèle Taïna Audette.

The 2014 federal budget released by Finance Minister Jim Flaherty confirmed new core funding of $1.25 billion from 2016–17 to 2018–19 in support of First Nations education with an annual growth rate of 4.5 %, and included an Enhanced Education Fund that will provide funding of $160 million over 4 years starting in 2015–16 and $500 million over 7 years beginning in 2015–16 for a new First Nations Education Infrastructure Fund. NWAC is pleased that overall education funds are to be increased but is concerned that once again no specific measures or supports are carved out to meet the needs of more than half the Aboriginal population, that is, Aboriginal women, many of whom are single parents.

The Economic Action Plan 2014 proposes to provide $36 million over four years to renew the Computers for Schools Program, providing students and interns with access to information and communications technology equipment and skills training. Yet, only $150,000 was allocated to Status of Women Canada in 2014–15 to increase mentorship among women entrepreneurs. “This is a totally unacceptable,” said President Michèle Taïna Audette.

President Michèle Taïna Audette expressed her hope for the future by saying, “We must remember to create programs specifically for Aboriginal women when we talk about education, economic development, safety and security, so that we can truly begin to improve their lives. Education and economic security, skills and training for women will truly provide Aboriginal women with options and help them to not only participate in the economy but make it thrive. We must work together, leaders and governments, to ensure that these measures will make an impact on the very people they were meant to reach. Unfortunately, this budget will not permit the realization of my dreams and aspirations for Aboriginal women, the most disadvantaged group in Canada.”

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) is founded on the collective goal to enhance, promote, and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well being of First Nations and Métis women within First Nation, Métis and Canadian societies. As a national organization representing Aboriginal women since 1974, NWAC’s mandate is to achieve equality for all Aboriginal women in Canada.

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For more information on NWAC please contact:

Claudette Dumont Smith, Executive Director
1-800-461-4043 or cdumontsmith@nwac.ca

14.02.12 NWAC Disappointed in Yesterday’s Budget

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